• Embodied at the GPO

    Photo credit: Luca Truffarelli

  • Embodied at the GPO

    Photo credit: Luca Truffarelli

  • Embodied at the GPO

    Photo credit: Luca Truffarelli

  • Embodied at the GPO

    Photo credit: Luca Truffarelli

  • Embodied at the GPO

    Photo credit: Luca Truffarelli

Ireland

Embodied at the GPO

Embodied is a series of six new dance solos by female choreographers based in Ireland that calls attention to the role of women as initiators of change within Irish society. Taking place 100 years after the reading of the Proclamation to the Irish people on the steps of the General Post Office, this new Irish work will make a contemporary response to the 1916 Proclamation as it journeys through the original GPO building and the newly opened GPO Witness History Centre.

Dublin Dance Festival has chosen to work with female choreographers to present their response to the Proclamation in contrast to the predominantly male voices and testimonies surrounding the events of 1916. Embodied is directed by leading Irish choreographer Liz Roche and will be documented by photographer Luca Truffarelli. This is a unique opportunity to see this historically significant performance in a private and intimate setting within the GPO.

Embodied: a trail of six female dance solos:

Her Supreme Hour by Jessie Keenan
Years of fitting into a patriarchal structure have taken its toll on the female body. This solo work looks at how women are forced to adjust and change, physically and vocally, in order to be seen and heard in our male dominated society.

Fógraím / I Proclaim by Sibéal Davitt
Through the medium of Morse code and movement, Fógraím / I Proclaim uses the human body to proclaim the key ideas and ideals of Forógra na hÉireann. This piece draws upon elements of Irish traditional 'sean-nós' and contemporary dance.

Walking Pale by Jessica Kennedy & Megan Kennedy (junk ensemble)
Exploring rebellion and failure, Walking Pale investigates the idea of the ‘radical female’ and how women are perceived in Ireland. This sits alongside the concept of new Ireland - of what the country represents now, and what it was expected to be.

The 27th Manifesto by Liv O'Donoghue
In reclaiming the words of our past, we uncover a vision for our future. Drawing on pivotal speeches by women through time, this work is a retrospective of the forgotten female voice in history.

The endless story of trying to make new out of a single self by Iseli-Chiodi Dance Company (Jazmín Chiodi)
Standing on a barricade, a woman internalises the battle she faces at the crossroads of change. This dance and visual arts experience observes the influence of memory and personal imprint on our concept of self history and social history.

160 Voices by Emma O’Kane
As a woman in Ireland, what are you willing to risk to improve your life and have your voice heard in 2016? Responses from an anonymous survey, 160 Voices is a microcosm of the wishes of women in Ireland today.

Director: Liz Roche. Lighting Designer: Sinead McKenna. Costume Designer: Saileog O’Halloran. Visual Documentation: Luca Truffarelli. Production Manager: Rob Usher.

Development partner: Dance Ireland. Venue partners: CoisCéim Dance Theatre, Mermaid Arts Centre, The Lir Academy.

Embodied has been commissioned by An Post through the GPO Witness History Public Art Commissions curated by Ruairí Ó Cuív and Valerie Connor.

The GPO, O'Connell Street. Entrance is via Prince’s St North side of GPO

  • Dates
    Wed 20 April, Thu 21 April, Fri 22 April
  • Times
    8.00pm, 8.45pm, 9.30pm nightly
  • Duration
    75 mins approx. (no interval)
  • Cost
    €15

Notes
The performance is a trail of six solo pieces and involves periods of standing and walking. Wheelchair users and those with limited mobility are advised to book for the 9.30pm performance.

Doors open strictly 20 minutes before performance start time and latecomers will not be admitted.

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